A newer version of this documentation is available.

View the latest version

Cluster Events

Listening for Member Events

The Membership Listener interface has methods that are invoked for the following events:

  • memberAdded: A new member is added to the cluster.

  • memberRemoved: An existing member leaves the cluster.

To write a Membership Listener class, you implement the MembershipListener interface and its methods.

The following is an example Membership Listener class.

public class ClusterMembershipListener implements MembershipListener {

    public void memberAdded(MembershipEvent membershipEvent) {
        System.err.println("Added: " + membershipEvent);
    }

    public void memberRemoved(MembershipEvent membershipEvent) {
        System.err.println("Removed: " + membershipEvent);
    }
}

When a respective event is fired, the membership listener outputs the addresses of the members that joined and left, and also which attribute changed on which member.

Registering Membership Listeners

After you create your class, you can configure your cluster to include the membership listener. Below is an example using the method addMembershipListener.

HazelcastInstance hazelcastInstance = Hazelcast.newHazelcastInstance();
hazelcastInstance.getCluster().addMembershipListener( new ClusterMembershipListener() );

With the above approach, there is the possibility of missing events between the creation of the instance and registering the listener. To overcome this race condition, Hazelcast allows you to register listeners in the configuration. You can register listeners using declarative, programmatic, or Spring configuration, as shown below.

The following is an example programmatic configuration.

Config config = new Config();
config.addListenerConfig(
new ListenerConfig( "com.yourpackage.ClusterMembershipListener" ) );

The following is an example of the equivalent declarative configuration.

  • XML

  • YAML

  • Spring

<hazelcast>
    ...
    <listeners>
        <listener>
            com.yourpackage.ClusterMembershipListener
        </listener>
    </listeners>
    ...
</hazelcast>
hazelcast:
  listeners:
    - com.yourpackage.ClusterMembershipListener
<hz:listeners>
    <hz:listener class-name="com.yourpackage.ClusterMembershipListener"/>
    <hz:listener implementation="MembershipListener"/>
</hz:listeners>

Listening for Distributed Object Events

The Distributed Object Listener methods distributedObjectCreated and distributedObjectDestroyed are invoked when a distributed object is created and destroyed throughout the cluster. To write a Distributed Object Listener class, you implement the DistributedObjectListener interface and its methods.

The following is an example Distributed Object Listener class.

public class ExampleDistObjListener implements DistributedObjectListener {

    @Override
    public void distributedObjectCreated(DistributedObjectEvent event) {
        DistributedObject instance = event.getDistributedObject();
        System.out.println("Created " + instance.getName() + ", service=" + instance.getServiceName());
    }

    @Override
    public void distributedObjectDestroyed(DistributedObjectEvent event) {
        System.out.println("Destroyed " + event.getObjectName() + ", service=" + event.getServiceName());
    }
}

When a respective event is fired, the distributed object listener outputs the event type, the object name and a service name (for example, for a Map object the service name is "hz:impl:mapService").

Registering Distributed Object Listeners

After you create your class, you can configure your cluster to include distributed object listeners. Below is an example using the method addDistributedObjectListener. You can also see this portion in the above class creation.

HazelcastInstance hazelcastInstance = Hazelcast.newHazelcastInstance();
ExampleDistObjListener example = new ExampleDistObjListener();

hazelcastInstance.addDistributedObjectListener( example );

With the above approach, there is the possibility of missing events between the creation of the instance and registering the listener. To overcome this race condition, Hazelcast allows you to register the listeners in the configuration. You can register listeners using declarative, programmatic, or Spring configuration, as shown below.

The following is an example programmatic configuration.

config.addListenerConfig(
new ListenerConfig( "com.yourpackage.ExampleDistObjListener" ) );

The following is an example of the equivalent declarative configuration.

  • XML

  • YAML

  • Spring

<hazelcast>
    ...
    <listeners>
        <listener>
            com.yourpackage.ExampleDistObjListener
        </listener>
    </listeners>
    ...
</hazelcast>
hazelcast:
  listeners:
    - com.yourpackage.ExampleDistObjListener
<hz:listeners>
    <hz:listener class-name="com.yourpackage.ExampleDistObjListener"/>
    <hz:listener implementation="DistributedObjectListener"/>
</hz:listeners>

Listening for Migration Events

The Migration Listener interface has methods that are invoked for the following events:

  • migrationStarted: The migration starts. A migration consists of a group of replica migrations which are planned together. The MigrationState parameter of the migrationStarted method shows information about the migration: start time of the process, number of the planned migrations, etc.

  • migrationFinished: The migration finishes. MigrationState parameter shows the result of the migration: number of the completed migrations, number of the remaining migrations, total elapsed time, etc.

  • replicaMigrationCompleted: A partition replica migration starts. Method’s parameter, ReplicaMigrationEvent, shows information about a replica migration: partition ID, replica index, source and destination members of the migration and elapsed time for this replica migration. Also it shows the progress of the overall migration: number of the completed and remaining replica migrations and total elapsed time.

  • replicaMigrationFailed: A partition replica migration fails. The MigrationEvent parameter shows the information about this replica migration and overall migration similar to the migrationCompleted method.

To write a Migration Listener class, you implement the MigrationListener interface and its methods.

The following is an example Migration Listener class.

public class ClusterMigrationListener implements MigrationListener {

    @Override
    public void migrationStarted(MigrationState state) {
        System.out.println("Migration Started: " + state);
    }

    @Override
    public void migrationFinished(MigrationState state) {
        System.out.println("Migration Finished: " + state);
    }

    @Override
    public void replicaMigrationCompleted(ReplicaMigrationEvent event) {
        System.out.println("Replica Migration Completed: " + event);
    }

    @Override
    public void replicaMigrationFailed(ReplicaMigrationEvent event) {
        System.out.println("Replica Migration Failed: " + event);
    }
}

Registering Migration Listeners

After you create your class, you can configure your cluster to include migration listeners. Below is an example using the method addMigrationListener.

HazelcastInstance hazelcastInstance = Hazelcast.newHazelcastInstance();

PartitionService partitionService = hazelcastInstance.getPartitionService();
partitionService.addMigrationListener( new ClusterMigrationListener() );

With the above approach, there is the possibility of missing events between the creation of the instance and registering the listener. To overcome this race condition, Hazelcast allows you to register the listeners in the configuration. You can register listeners using declarative, programmatic, or Spring configuration, as shown below.

The following is an example programmatic configuration.

config.addListenerConfig(
new ListenerConfig( "com.yourpackage.ClusterMigrationListener" ) );

The following is an example of the equivalent declarative configuration.

  • XML

  • YAML

  • Spring

<hazelcast>
    ...
    <listeners>
        <listener>
            com.yourpackage.ClusterMigrationListener
        </listener>
    </listeners>
    ...
</hazelcast>
hazelcast:
  listeners:
    - com.yourpackage.ClusterMigrationListener
<hz:listeners>
    <hz:listener class-name="com.yourpackage.ClusterMigrationListener"/>
    <hz:listener implementation="MigrationListener"/>
</hz:listeners>

Listening for Partition Lost Events

Hazelcast provides fault-tolerance by keeping multiple copies of your data. For each partition, one of your cluster members becomes the owner and some of the other members become replica members, based on your configuration. Nevertheless, data loss may occur if a few members crash simultaneously.

Let’s consider the following example with three members: N1, N2, N3 for a given partition-0. N1 is owner of partition-0. N2 and N3 are the first and second replicas respectively. If N1 and N2 crash simultaneously, partition-0 loses its data that is configured with less than two backups. For instance, if we configure a map with one backup, that map loses its data in partition-0 since both owner and first replica of partition-0 have crashed. However, if we configure our map with two backups, it does not lose any data since a copy of partition-0’s data for the given map also resides in N3.

The Partition Lost Listener notifies for possible data loss occurrences with the information of how many replicas are lost for a partition. It listens to PartitionLostEvent instances. Partition lost events are dispatched per partition.

Partition loss detection is done after a member crash is detected by the other members and the crashed member is removed from the cluster. Please note that false-positive PartitionLostEvent instances may be fired on the network split errors.

Writing a Partition Lost Listener Class

To write a Partition Lost Listener, you implement the PartitionLostListener interface and its partitionLost method, which is invoked when a partition loses its owner and all backups.

The following is an example Partition Lost Listener class.

public class ConsoleLoggingPartitionLostListener implements PartitionLostListener {
    @Override
    public void partitionLost(PartitionLostEvent event) {
        System.out.println(event);
    }
}

When a PartitionLostEvent is fired, the partition lost listener given above outputs the partition ID, the replica index that is lost and the member that has detected the partition loss. The following is an example output.

com.hazelcast.partition.PartitionLostEvent{partitionId=242, lostBackupCount=0,
eventSource=Address[192.168.2.49]:5701}

Registering Partition Lost Listeners

After you create your class, you can configure your cluster programmatically or declaratively to include the partition lost listener. Below is an example of its programmatic configuration.

HazelcastInstance hazelcastInstance = Hazelcast.newHazelcastInstance();
hazelcastInstance.getPartitionService().addPartitionLostListener( new ConsoleLoggingPartitionLostListener() );

The following is an example of the equivalent declarative configuration.

  • XML

  • YAML

<hazelcast>
    ...
    <listeners>
        <listener>
            com.yourpackage.ConsoleLoggingPartitionLostListener
        </listener>
    </listeners>
    ...
</hazelcast>
hazelcast:
  listeners:
    - com.yourpackage.ConsoleLoggingPartitionLostListener

Listening for Lifecycle Events

The Lifecycle Listener notifies for the following events:

  • STARTING: A member is starting.

  • STARTED: A member started.

  • SHUTTING_DOWN: A member is shutting down.

  • SHUTDOWN: A member’s shutdown has completed.

  • MERGING: A member is merging with the cluster.

  • MERGED: A member’s merge operation has completed.

  • CLIENT_CONNECTED: A Hazelcast Client connected to the cluster.

  • CLIENT_DISCONNECTED: A Hazelcast Client disconnected from the cluster.

The following is an example Lifecycle Listener class.

public class NodeLifecycleListener implements LifecycleListener {
     @Override
     public void stateChanged(LifecycleEvent event) {
         System.err.println(event);
     }
}

This listener is local to an individual member. It notifies the application that uses Hazelcast about the events mentioned above for a particular member.

Registering Lifecycle Listeners

After you create your class, you can configure your cluster to include lifecycle listeners. Below is an example using the method addLifecycleListener.

HazelcastInstance hazelcastInstance = Hazelcast.newHazelcastInstance();
hazelcastInstance.getLifecycleService().addLifecycleListener( new NodeLifecycleListener() );

With the above approach, there is the possibility of missing events between the creation of the instance and registering the listener. To overcome this race condition, Hazelcast allows you to register the listeners in the configuration. You can register listeners using declarative, programmatic, or Spring configuration, as shown below.

The following is an example programmatic configuration.

config.addListenerConfig(
    new ListenerConfig( "com.yourpackage.NodeLifecycleListener" ) );

The following is an example of the equivalent declarative configuration.

  • XML

  • YAML

  • Spring

<hazelcast>
    ...
    <listeners>
        <listener>
            com.yourpackage.NodeLifecycleListener
        </listener>
    </listeners>
    ...
</hazelcast>
hazelcast:
  listeners:
    - com.yourpackage.NodeLifecycleListener
<hz:listeners>
    <hz:listener class-name="com.yourpackage.NodeLifecycleListener"/>
    <hz:listener implementation="LifecycleListener"/>
</hz:listeners>

Listening for Clients

The client listener is used by the Hazelcast cluster members. It notifies the cluster member when a client is connected to or disconnected from it, i.e., the clients fire an event from only one member they are connected to. Other cluster members do not fire a "client is connected" or "client is disconnected" event.

To write a client listener class, you implement the ClientListener interface and its methods clientConnected and clientDisconnected, which are invoked when a client is connected to or disconnected from the cluster. You can add your client listener as shown below.

hazelcastInstance.getClientService().addClientListener(new ExampleClientListener());

The following is the equivalent declarative configuration.

  • XML

  • YAML

  • Spring

<hazelcast>
    ...
    <listeners>
        <listener>
            com.yourpackage.ExampleClientListener
        </listener>
    </listeners>
    ...
</hazelcast>
hazelcast:
  listeners:
    - com.yourpackage.ExampleClientListener
<hz:listeners>
    <hz:listener class-name="com.yourpackage.ExampleClientListener"/>
    <hz:listener implementation="com.yourpackage.ExampleClientListener"/>
</hz:listeners>
You can also add event listeners to a Hazelcast client. See the Client Listenerconfig section for the related information.